Homemade Dry Mein (Noodles)

Homemade Dry Mein (Noodles)

Dry Mein, or sometimes called Dry Noodles, originated from Maui’s local restaurant, Sam Sato’s. The noodles are tossed with a shoyu-oyster sauce and garnished with local garnishes like charsiu, green onions, and bean sprouts. Served on the side is a chicken flavored broth. The “dry” part of the name refers to the noodles being served without the broth compared to the traditional ramen. Instead the broth is served in a separate bowl so you can dip the noodles to your liking.

Dry Mein

This recipe has been requested by a few of my Facebook followers. When I saw the request, I was delighted to cover this recipe because it brought back so many memories of eating at Sam Sato’s. The experience was always memorable and delicious! Growing up on Maui, Sam Sato’s is a must-go in order to have the full island experience when it comes to food. I mention Sam Sato’s because this restaurant was the founder of this recipe. Thank goodness to them for inventing this blessed dish!

Why You'll Fall in Love with Dry Mein

  • Simple recipe
  • Bursting with flavors
  • Quick meal to make for the ‘ohana (family)
  • Only need to use one cooking equipment!
dry mein

What Garnishes Do You Use?

The garnishing for the Dry Mein is up to your preference. The most common use for Dry Mein are char siu, green onions, and bean sprouts. But remember this is just a dish that can be modified to your liking. You can have garnishing like:

  • Kamaboko (fishcake)
  • Spam
  • Ham
  • Carrots
  • Cabbage

It’s up to your imagination!  Just remember when it comes to garnishes, make sure they are sliced thinly or chopped in smaller pieces. The point is to eat the garnishing without struggling to eat a huge chunk of it while slurping down the noodles.

dry mein

Why Char Siu?

Well, why not char siu? Char siu is such a classic meat garnishing that it’s pretty much mandatory to have in any of your garnishing. If you have trouble accessing char siu, don’t worry! I actually covered this recipe here. But what if you are too lazy or not enough time to make char siu? Check your local asian stores. I guarantee that they carry it. Just ask for a pound or more for your guilty pleasure, meals, or garnishing. 

Char siu

Video Tutorial

Check out this video to help you gain more insight on how to make Dry Mein. Also, subscribe to my YouTube to help support me so I can continue making more of these contents. Mahalo!

Dry mein

Dry Mein (Noodles)

Dry Mein, or sometimes called Dry Noodles, originated from Maui's local restaurant, Sam Sato's. The noodles are tossed with a shoyu-oyster sauce and garnished with local garnishes like charsiu, green onions, and bean sprouts. Served on the side is a chicken flavored broth.
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 7 mins
Total Time 17 mins
Course Main Course, Soup
Cuisine Chinese, Hawaiian, Japanese
Servings 2 people

Equipment

  • Pot

Ingredients
  

  • 2-3 packages fresh ramen noodles
  • char siu
  • green onions
  • bean sprouts

Sauce:

  • 1 tsp hondashi
  • 2 tbsp shoyu (soy sauce)
  • 2 tbsp chicken stock
  • 1 tbsp oyster sauce
  • 2 tbsp oil (vegetable/canola oil)

Broth:

  • 1/2 cup chicken stock
  • 1/2 tbsp hondashi

Instructions
 

Prepare the noodles:

  • Bring a pot with water to a rolling boil. Add the noodles to the pot and let it cook per instructions on the package or until it is al dente. Stir the noodles to prevent any sticking to the bottom of the pot.
  • Drain the noodles and rinse it with water until all of the starch is gone.

Prepare the sauce:

  • Dilute the hondashi with the hot chicken stock. Mix it well until the particles have dissolved.
  • Whisk together the diluted hondsashi, shoyu, oyster sauce, and oil In a small bowl. Keep whisking until the oil has been full incorporated with the ingredients.

Prepare the broth:

  • Heat up the chicken stock and add it to a small serving bowl. Add the hondashi to the stock and whisk it until it has dissolved.

Assembling the Dry Mein:

  • In a large bowl add the noodles and sauce. Toss the noodles until all of the noodles have been covered in the sauce.
  • Serve the noodles in a bowl, then garnish it with char siu, green onions, and bean sprouts (or any other toppings you prefer). Enjoy it with the side broth to dip in as you please!

Notes

* If you don't have char siu, you could replace it with kamaboko (fish cake), spam, ham, or any meat as long as it is sliced thinly.
* The oil is to help prevent the noodles from sticking to each other.
Keyword broth, char siu, dry mein, fast, noodles, quick, simple, soup

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